Should I Make my Teen Get a Job?

Posted by Janet Heinsler on February 02, 2015

Being a good parent is a tough job that never ends. Part of being a good parent involves the role of caretaker where you make sure you child is fed, clothed and safe.  Besides this “caretaking” role is the job of preparing them to become a productive member of society. Although there are several ways of doing this involving different techniques, I would argue that having your teen get a summer job or part-time job during the school year goes a long way in helping them learn several invaluable lessons they will need as they learn how to navigate life on their own.

The reasons to encourage your child to get a job as soon as they meet the age requirement, are huge. Having a job helps them learn the importance of keeping a schedule, developing a good work ethic and many more life skills. As a parent you owe it to your child to encourage them to get a job. Failure to do so is only setting them up for failure in the future. Here are some of the things your son and daughter will learn if they take on a job when they are a teen.

 

People Skills:  Although teens have learned some people skills by interacting with fellow students and teachers, a job will bring on a new set of people skills. Having to interact with a boss, fellow workers and the public helps them augment these people skills.

Communication Skills: Most ads for jobs will claim that one of the requirements is “good communication skills.”  Teens are just in the process of learning good communication skills and a new job requires them to do new tasks which will require listening to someone as how to do it. In addition they will need to listen to the boss and be able to communicate back to them.

Managing their Finances:  When your teen starts making money the first thing they are probably going to want to do is spend it. This provides you with the opportunity to show them the basic rules of money management. You can show them how to open a checking account, how to keep a book for their checking account, how to save and how to follow a budget.

Responsibility: Having a job will help your teen learn how to be responsible. They need to be able get themselves up and ready to go to work; they have to  be responsible at their job and show their boss that they are capable of carrying out what their boss asks them to.

There are several types of jobs your teen could get as long as they are capable of doing it.  These include, but are not limited to, babysitting, cashier at a store, working on a farm, a caddy, cutting lawns, shoveling snow, dog walker, lifeguard, and I know some kids who started their own business and started a pooper scooper job for the neighbors who were too busy to pick up after their own dogs. Whatever job they can get is well worth it.

Be sure to encourage them so they will learn how to become a productive member of society.